Divine Science

Parthenon from west

Parthenon from west (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To the Ancient Greeks, Zeus was not a myth. Neither was Poseidon, Hercules, Perseus, or Hades. These were real gods and demigods. The landscape of Greece and Italy still have the ruins of the temples that once stood to pay homage to these divine beings. So what happened? The answer is actually rather simple. People stopped believing. It had always been the belief that as long as the gods were worshiped and prayed to that they would be strong. All except Hades who obtained his strength through fear. The Romans had a similar pantheon of gods and the biggest difference between the Greeks and the Romans (aside from the names) was that the Greek deities resided on Mt. Olympus, again except for Hades who lived in the under-world. The disappearance of these deities changed the religions and beliefs of ancient times into the myths of modern times. The question now is, are the current gods that are worshiped (Yahweh, Allah, Jesus, etc.) any different? Is it possible that God is just an imaginary friend to a theist and as a result completely nonexistent to an atheist?

If science is the source of absolute truth then it would seem that we have no known origin, no known purpose, and no watchful father-like deity that we can turn to. We are just meaningless globs of matter and when we expire we decompose into dust and are no more significant than the dirt we are buried in. The various emotions experienced by mankind of love, joy, sadness and hope are mere chemical reactions that have evolved over time and our sense of morality is just a natural evolutionary code of ethics that developed over time as man increased in intelligence and furthered technology. We have nothing beyond the realm of current existence and life beyond the grave is nothing more than the musings of mythology and fairy tales.

The existence of God is not provable by science. This is an irrefutable fact that only the dogmatically sheepish would try to argue. The existence of God is an argument that mankind has had with itself since the earliest of times. People have slaughtered entire villages and marched their “Armies of God” across the world to force conversion and spread their religious influence as if by divine directive for thousands of years. Even today the madness continues by way of IEDs and suicide bombers on one end and the endless intellectual and apologetic debates in the blogosphere on the other. One of the biggest arguments used to disprove Theism is the existence of evil and why bad things happen to good people. This argument is one that human perception cannot rationally or objectionably engage in, unless they look at the broader picture displayed in nature. Most theists (Christians in particular) believe that the reason bad things (or evil) happen is because of sin. They trace this back to the Biblical tale of Adam and Eve and the forbidden fruit. Original Sin is a flawed dogmatic doctrine of the church that is just as much an injustice to infants and children as it is an illogical and incomplete explanation. Aside from the obvious issue of children and their suffering, what about animals? Does not the sheep live in fear of the wolf? Isn’t it excruciatingly painful when an alligator rips a deer to pieces? Anyone with even the slightest amount of common sense knows that although animals may not be able to drive or write, they do have intelligence. So that means they, like man, are very likely capable of emotions and exercising free-will to a certain extent. Do animals suffer as a result of Eve’s sin or do they just suffer because that is part of the balance of nature and the circle of life? To say that the animals suffer as a result of the sins of man is ridiculous. As such, the suffering of people cannot be pointed to the sins of a mythical woman either. I am sure someone is saying that I am ridiculous to equate the murder of a person at the hands of another person with that of an animal hunting its prey. What if man is the prey? Is it an act of evil if a man is attacked by sharks and eaten alive? Well to the family of the man its a tragedy but to the sharks it was a meal. How dare I say such a thing?!? Well, when a man kills a deer and uses the meat for his family its OK right? Perhaps that deer was a mother and its babies will now die because they can no longer nurse. A tragedy to the baby deer and just another meal for the hunter. Dare I even mention if the deer is shot just for sport…

Now, I know that I used some parallels that some may think are extreme comparisons. In a world of instant gratification, reality TV, self-help speakers, and personal conveniences it becomes almost impossible to realize that we are just specks of dust in relation to the enormity of the cosmos and that our own little realities are irrelevant in the grand design. So just as we pay no mention to the colonies of ants we destroy when we spray pesticides, the tides take no notice of the villages that are destroyed when an earthquake triggers a tsunami. Evil and Satan are easy cop outs (I will expand on these in my next post), but the balance of nature is the true cause.

So does this chaotic cosmos have a Creator? Does God exist? Well a scientist will tell you that God cannot be proven. God cannot be seen and cannot be tested. So let’s use their logic as we review a few concepts. Can we prove why a compass will always point north? The theory is that the earth has an invisible magnetic field that causes this. Gravity is also invisible and yet it is the undisputed reason given for why whatever goes up must come down. The winds cannot be seen, yet scientists have been able to discover that the changes in atmospheric pressure (also something invisible) in conjunction with the rotation of the earth and it revolution are what causes the wind. The sun emits light that is generated from a burning ball of fire and gases in space. This light is invisible yet enables one to see. This light is invisible yet when gather through a lens can burn a piece of paper. Light from the sun also warms the surface of the whole planet.

Great are the works of the LORD, studied by all who have pleasure in them. – Psalms 111:2 (RSV)

I have given some completely invisible scientific theories that have not been disputed and I do not dispute these theories, nor do I reject the science behind them even though they use unseen concepts as their basis of proof. If the unseen can be proven in scientific theory, why is it not acceptable as proof of Deity? How can one dispute the positive impact that God, whether a provable entity or not, has on the most faithful of people? Can we deny that people are moved by their faith in God to be charitable? Can we deny the fact that people are willing to give up their own lives for these beliefs? Can we deny that the truly faithful try to live a life of humility and selflessness? Can we deny the hope that otherwise hopeless people feel when they discover faith? Can we deny the inner strength a person may feel after a sincere prayer?

Faith in God will vary from person to person. It is not a conclusive science, nor will it ever be. It has been said that God is Light. Which is ironic because we can’t see light and we can’t see God either. We can feel the warmth caused by light of the sun and a believer can feel God by the warmth within their soul. Maybe God is imaginary or maybe God is calling and only those with ears to hear and are listening.

11 thoughts on “Divine Science

  1. it would seem that we have no known origin, no known purpose, and no watchful father-like deity that we can turn to. We are just meaningless globs of matter and when we expire we decompose into dust and are no more significant than the dirt we are buried in. The various emotions experienced by mankind of love, joy, sadness and hope are mere chemical reactions that have evolved over time and our sense of morality is just a natural evolutionary code of ethics that developed over time as man increased in intelligence and furthered technology. We have nothing beyond the realm of current existence and life beyond the grave is nothing more than the musings of mythology and fairy tales.

    As I read the above, I was making preparations to slit my wrists. 🙂 However, it got more hopeful as you moved along.

    The existence of God is not provable by science. This is an irrefutable fact that only the dogmatically sheepish would try to argue.

    People are always so quick to point this fact out; however, they forget to finish the thought with the equally true statement that “The nonexistence of God is not provable by science.” Anyone who proclaims either extreme is unrealistically dogmatic, don’t you think?

    What if man is the prey? Is it an act of evil if a man is attacked by sharks and eaten alive? Well to the family of the man its a tragedy but to the sharks it was a meal.

    I love exploring ethics where one man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter. As you so cleverly brought out here, you really can’t judge what is good and what is bad, because it is always a matter of perspective. I think one of the keys to live is getting inside the head (as much as possible) of those who oppose you or make your life hard. You find quite a different world in there than you expected. Most people aren’t mean on purpose, but they have “a side” too.

    This blog post had some really intriguing perspectives and obvious ambivalence about God and matters of faith where, once again, I find myself wrestling right along with you on this confusing, sometimes light-less journey of faith. Good thoughts. Keep em coming.

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    • Completely agree with your point that science has not been able to prove that God does not exist.

      It is a Kabbalistic belief that the highest rung on the sephirotic ladder is Nothingness. Which to me is fascinating. Not only is God everywhere and within everything, there is also nothing. Which to me tells me the pathway to light is more of a balancing act than it is a clear cut path or answer.

      Out of darkness came light. Order from chaos. To know joy one must experience sorrow. To know love requires the knowledge of rejection. The ying and the yang…

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  2. Kabbalah also teaches that the Divine Feminine aspect of God (the Shekinah, I believe) has the possibility of being imperfect in and through “Her” creation, and therefore experiences all of the “evil” and becoming along with and through us. Somehow that is more comforting to me.

    Yeah…”evening and morning were the ___ day.” Evening is same word for chaos and morning same word for order. I love that…part of the mystical understanding of Gen. 1 being about the new creation taking place inside each of us.

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    • That’s right Julie. Shekinah is feminine and represents the Divine presence in the earthly realm that we live in.

      I’d recommend a nice primer on the Zohar, but I think I’ve made you spend enough on books already :).

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    • Sure thing Brother Ed. Pike was heavily influenced by both Kabbalah and Gnosticism. There were a number of sects some predate Christianity and some were esoteric forms of Christianity. Thanks for the suggestion!

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  3. Please excuse a dumb question. Is it possible to square gnosticism, unitarianism, and deism with modern Masonry? For whatever reason, I see movement within BLs and GLs toward fundimentalist Christianity. Followed by covert and sometimes overt intolerance. Even down to anything that smacks of being nonChristian. Perhaps it is a regional thing, but it gives me cause for concern. If this is the wrong forum for such issues, please let me know.

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    • The irony is our ritual is very much a blend of Gnosticism and Kabbalah – and that is just on the surface. When you do a deeper dive you can see that the portrayal of Hiram Abif as the injection of a Unitarian concept and the movements throughout the lodge very much in line with the lunar and solar influences of Zoroaster.

      I won’t go much further into the ritual as this is a public blog, but that should be enough to get you thinking.

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  4. Pingback: In Which a Character is revealed as a Demigod « FanFiction Fridays

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